Caroline Pay, joint chief creative officer at Grey London, reveals three great ads she admires but had nothing to do with

A few words about Caroline

After initially being told she had "no hope" by a former chief executive, Caroline went on to establish her career as a creative at Mother, where she co-created and launched FRANK, the governmental drug service for young people. Later joining BBH as deputy ECD, she has worked on major accounts such as Levi’s, Coca-Cola, Cadbury’s, Boots and Tesco. Caroline was awarded Campaign’s Best of the Best award as well as an Emmy for a project with MTV in the US.

Now one half of Grey’s chief creative duo, Caroline is passionate about discovering and developing young talent, and is an active voice in the push for diversity and equality within the creative industry.

Caroline’s choices

VW "Bubble Boy"

Mike Mills directed this 2003 spot for the launch of the VW Beetle Convertible which tells the story of a young office worker longing for excitement outside of his grey, mundane and monotonous life. Each day is the same tiresome routine until he spots the new VW Beetle convertible outside of his office building and then suddenly anything is possible...

The ad won a Silver Lion at the 2003 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

Bodyform "Blood normal"

This 2017 AMV BBDO campaign directed by Daniel Wolfe aimed at "breaking the taboos that hold women back", shows women dealing with periods in everyday situations and is the first in the UK to depict real menstrual blood instead of the blue liquid traditionally used.

"Blood normal" which was written by Nicholas Hulley and art directed by Nadja Lossgott, who argue that "society has made women feel disgusted by their periods for such a long time" aims to normalise periods through a more positive representation.

Martina Poulopoti, the global brand communication manager for feminine care at Bodyform says she has received personal emails from people thanking her for the ad.

Playstation "Mountain"

TBWA\London crafted this 60 second ad shot in Brazil over 6 days by multi-award winning director Frank Budgen.

Five cameras followed stuntmen and over 500 extras as they ran up a 20-foot cone on top of Brazil’s highest skyscraper, fighting to make their way to the top. Sony wanted to capture the nature of competitive instinct while showcasing the capacity of the new PS2 to introduce players to a worldwide competitive community. 

For the final scene, Jordi Bares, 3D artist at The Mill was tasked with creating 146,000 digital figures with touch-based AI to help them behave realistically.

About this series

In this series of short films, leading Thinkbox Academy members have the tricky task of selecting just three TV ads that have inspired them: brilliant commercials, old and new, that they admire but had nothing to do with.

The idea is not only to explore some of our greatest ads in the company of people who know a thing or two about making them, but also because of the proven link between creativity and effectiveness encourage the advertising industry to even greater heights.

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